I just took this picture today and I am still shocked at that price.

I took this picture today and I am still shocked at that price.

Can you think of a topic more exciting that this?  Are you thinking “She is really going out on a limb here!”  My good friends are probably laughing right now, because they know that is a regular occurrence with me.  We oranges like doing that.  It keeps life exciting.

Anyway, I’m sick of paying for laundry detergent and I don’t like wondering what crazy chemicals are in there and if I want healthy laundry detergent, it costs twice that of the stuff you get at the grocery.  I just don’t like that.  Anybody agree with me on this?

Here is the cheapest one I could find at Walmart.  Keep reading.  You won’t believe how easy and cheap the homemade version is.

Here is the cheapest one I could find at Walmart. I used a cheap brand like this for awhile, but you still have the chemical issue and we can go even cheaper.

Also, my husband and I are on the Dave Ramsey gazelle-intensity thing of paying off all debt so we can have more FREEDOM – ahhhh – my keyword again.  So I am highly motivated to find ways to cut costs and still do relatively healthy things.

But, I have been making my own laundry detergent for about 2 years now.  I researched it quite a bit on the internet and with friends.  Some people make the powder, but I’m thinking with all the water you add, the liquid has got to be more cost effective.  And something about the liquid kind  makes me think it mixes in better.  That’s just me.

So Easy.  15 Minutes.  Inexpensive.  Great Satisfaction.

Yes.  I will take all of those things!  So get yer pot out.  (I’m thinking Beverly Hillbillies here.)

img_06161

Laundry Soap Recipe

Supplies:

1 bar of soap.  1 cup of Borax.  1 cup of Washing soda.  Stock pot.  5 gallon bucket.  Grater.  Water.

Grate 1 bar of soap.

img_0613

I use this Kirk’s Castille soap that I got at my grocery store. (Jumbo for all you hometown girls.)

img_06061

I’ve read people use Fels Naptha or Ivory.   The ingredients in the Castille soap are:  coconut soap, water, coconut oil, vegetable glycerin, natural fragrance.  Very good stuff.

img_0615

The Beauty Of Coconut Oil

By the way, if you have not discovered coconut oil to cook with, use on your body, etc. let that be your next research project.  Here is a link to get you started.  It is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-parasitic, and anti-fungal.  I think that about covers everything.

The main things I use it for are cooking and baking anything unless I particularly want olive oil for some reason, and makeup remover.  But there are many other uses.  Check it out.

Pour 12 cups of water into your stockpot and heat on hi.  Pour in your grated soap and let it dissolve as it heats up.

img_0618

Add 1 cup washing soda.  (not baking soda)

Add 1 cup borax.  Get both at the grocery.

img_0619

Stir til dissolved.

img_0620

Usually I let it boil for a few minutes.  I’ve read where others let it heat up to right before boiling.  In the end, sometimes my soap is on the watery side and sometimes it is more gelatinous.  It doesn’t matter.  There is no difference in cleaning ability.  But it may be that letting it get to right before that boiling point makes the consistency more gelatinous.  I’m not sure.

Pull out your 5 gallon paint bucket.

img_0623

You can buy a new one at Lowes or a hardware store.  I thought I  shouldn’t use one that actually had paint in it, but if you can clean it out really well, I think it would be fine.

Pour 8 cups of hot water into bucket.

Pour your cooked soap mixture into bucket.  Stir.

img_0628

Pour 2 and 3/4 gallons more water in (that would be 11 quarts).  Stir.

img_0629

Notice the picture above: the 5 gallon bucket is a good idea so you don’t go sloshing your soap out when you move it around.  I have also made 1/2 this amount before though.  So, do what works.

You can add essential oils at this point.  One time I added a whole bottle of lavender essential oil.  I wanted it to really smell good and for the smell to last and it did!  They say you can just add a few drops.  I don’t do that anymore and it smells just fine.  Adding essential oil also raises the price, but hey, if that’s important to you, go for it!

Let sit for 24 hours and it’s ready to use.  I usually put a top over it while it sits.  I’m not sure why.  Maybe to keep the bugs, or any other random flying particle, out.

img_0665

Then I pour it into 2 old laundry detergent bottles and 1 smaller container.

img_0667

The smaller one is easier for children to handle.

img_06691

This recipe fills all 3 of these containers to the brim.  The large containers are 1  1/3 gallons or 175 fluid ounces and the small container is 2 quarts.

img_0676

Use 1/2 cup per load.  This 1/2 cup came with the old detergent.

img_0687

Wow, decent nails.  Usually they are cut down to the nub.  Function vs. Beauty.  Isn’t it all about finding the balance.

Back to soap.  I also use Shout on stains.  Our clothes are perfectly clean and fine.  Does this sound like I’m on a commercial in the 1950’s wearing a poodle skirt and heels?  Ouch.  I don’t think I’ve worn heels in decades.  Maybe once or twice.

Cost Breakdown:

UPDATE:  Earlier I had a cost breakdown from a girl on the internet from 2007, but I decided to get my hiney up and over to the store and do a current cost analysis for you.  Again, for you hometown girls, all of this is available at Jumbo.  Walmart did not have the Washing Soda.  You could use Ivory for the bar of soap and it would be even cheaper.

Borax  76oz  3.49.  This is .37 per cup.

Washing Soda  55oz  2.89.  This is .42 per cup.

Kirk’s Castille soap  4 oz bar.  $1.15

My recipe cost a total of $1.94.

Did You Catch That?

Homemade detergent = .0046 cents/oz.  That is less than 1/2 of a penny per ounce.
Cheap detergent at store = 04 cents /oz.
Expensive detergent at store = 13.4 cents /oz.
My recipe gave me 414 ounces and cost a total of $1.94.  And it’s healthy!

It All Adds Up!

Laundry Soap Recipe (for easy printing)

Supplies:

1 bar of soap.  1 cup of Borax.  1 cup of Washing soda.  Stock pot.  5 gallon bucket.  Grater.  Water.

Grate 1 bar of soap.  I use this Castille soap that I got at my grocery store.  I’ve read people use Fels Naptha or Ivory.

Pour 12 cups of water into your stockpot and heat on hi.  Pour in your grated soap and let it dissolve as it heats up.

Add 1 cup washing soda.

Add 1 cup borax.

Stir til dissolved.

Usually I let it boil for a few minutes.  I’ve read where others let it heat up to right before boiling.  In the end, sometimes my soap is on the watery side and sometimes it is more gelatinous.  It doesn’t matter.  There is no difference in cleaning ability.  But it may be that letting it get to right before that boiling point makes the consistency more gelatinous.  I’m not sure.

Pour 8 cups of hot water into 5 gallon bucket.

Pour your cooked soap mixture into bucket.  Stir.

Pour 2 and 3/4 gallons more hot water in (that would be 11 quarts).  Stir.

Add essential oils if you want.

Let sit for 24 hours and it’s ready to use.  I usually put a top over it while it sits.  I’m not sure why.

Then I pour it into 2 or 3 old laundry detergent bottles so it’s easy to use.

Use 1/2 cup per load.

I also use Shout on stains.

God Bless.  Have a Grand Day!

Share: